September 2018 Library Reads Picks

The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle
by Stuart Turton

“Imagine the movie Groundhog Day, except this time Aiden Bishop wakes up each day in a deteriorating manor house, as a different person, and must work out who he is and how he relates to everyone else at the party commemorating the long ago death of a child. If he can’t solve the murder that occurs at the party, he is doomed to continue the loop every eight days. A riveting page turner.”

Becky Bowen, Kenton County Public Library, Erlanger, KY

Josh and Hazel’s Guide to Not Dating
by Christina Lauren

“Hazel is the eccentric, exuberant friend who’ll make you fall in love with her, and she’s not interested in being ‘dateable.’ Josh is busy being a workaholic, trying to make a long distance relationship work, and not pursuing romance with anyone else. But when his sister’s best friend Hazel blows back into his life, he is powerless to resist her genuine joie de vivre. If you’re looking for your next perfect read after The Kiss Quotient, look no further! A lovely slow burn.”

Elizabeth Gabriel, Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, WI

Lies
by T.M. Logan

“When Joe unwittingly discovers that his wife has been having an affair with her friend’s husband, his life starts to unravel. It seems that her lover now wants Joe out of the picture. Follow the cat-and-mouse plot as it explodes with a shocking finish! Great fun for those readers who love a good psychological thriller.”

Paulette Brooks, Elm Grove Public Library, Elm Grove, WI

Night and Silence
by Seanan McGuire

“Toby is back in this latest installment of the October Daye series. Still reeling and recovering from the events of the last book, Toby and company are laying low. When her human daughter goes missing (again), Toby embarks on a twisty-turny race against time to find her. A solid entry and good choice for libraries with a strong demand for fantasy and urban fantasy.”

Mei-Ling Thomas, Rochester Hills Public Library, Rochester, MI

Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen
by Sarah Bird

“A fascinating work of historical fiction about Cathay/Cathy Williams, a former slave turned Buffalo Soldier in post-Civil War America. Her raw and powerful story is sure to be popular with book clubs.”

Sarah Fetterman, Upper St. Clair Township Library, Upper St. Clair, PA

Lake Success: A Novel
by Gary Shteyngart

“Shteyngart delivers another painfully funny novel about ambition, disappointment, and the darker side of the American dream. For fans of witty, offbeat, satirical humor.”

Jennifer Alexander, St. Louis County Public Library, St. Louis, MO

The Dinner List: A Novel
by Rebecca Serle

“If you could have dinner with any five people, living or dead, who would they be? On her thirtieth birthday, Sabrina finds herself at dinner with her best friend, her ex-fiance, her long lost father, her college mentor and Audrey Hepburn, all with something to say to her. A charming combination of magical realism and romance.”

Tracy Babiasz, Chapel Hill Public Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Transcription: A Novel
by Kate Atkinson

“In WWII era London, Juliet Armstrong is working as an espionage monitor for MI5. Ten years later she suddenly finds herself targeted by dangerous individuals from her past. For fans of smart, witty, suspenseful, historical or spy fiction and authors like Tana French, Laurie R. King, and John Le Carre.”

Janet Lockhart, Wake County Public Libraries, Cary, NC

When the Lights Go Out
by Mary Kubica

“After her mother’s death, Jessie is trying is trying to rebuild her life. In her way is her debilitating insomnia and a secret that shakes the core of her identity. Psychological suspense with an unreliable narrator. This one’s for you Gone Girl fans.”

Diane Gring, Chester County Library & District Center, Exton, PA

Hitting the Books
by Jenn McKinlay

“McKinlay’s Lindsay Norris is back for another adventure in Briar Creek. As a fellow librarian, I appreciate her spot on observations of the library world. An upbeat cozy mystery with great characters and strong sense of place. For fans of the Aurora Teagarden mysteries and the Isabel Dalhousie mysteries.”

Carly Budzynski, Salem Public Library, Salem, VA

August 2018 Library Reads Picks

Vox

by Christina Dalcher

“In the future world depicted in Vox, women are limited to speaking 100 words per day. Readers will want to shout every word in their heads, hoard every book in their libraries, and second guess the words of every person in their lives. A captivating, timely book that explores women’s rights in a fast-paced, compelling story.”
                                                                                                                          Jennifer Gaenzle, Fort Fairfield Public Library, Fort Fairfield, ME

Our House

by Louise Candlish

“Full of secrets and surprises, Our House poses the question, “How well do you know the person you live with?” An attempt to co-habitate for the sake of the children leaves divorced mom Fiona alone and out in the cold. Readers will have a hard time putting down this twisty domestic suspense novel. Even after the last page is turned, the characters will linger.”

Annette Herbst, Columbia County Rural Library, Dayton, WA

Bellewether

by Susanna Kearsley

“A character-driven story with a nice surprise twist, this gothic-style fiction, set in 1759 Long Island, will not disappoint Kearsley’s many fans. Readers who enjoy good doses of romance, history, and magic will be pleased.”

Julie Raynor, High Point Public Library, High Point, NC

Good Luck with That

by Kristan Higgins

“Emerson, Georgia, and Marley met as teens at a “fat camp.” When one of them dies young, the others are forced to confront their own struggles with self-esteem and acceptance. With equal measures of humor and heartbreak, this book sparks questions about society’s idea of the perfect size and explores how body image can have far-reaching effects.”

Claudia Silk, Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, CT

The Masterpiece: A Novel

by Fiona Davis

“Disparate decades of New York City are capably brought to life through two strong and resourceful female characters in Davis’s latest work. At the center is the Grand Central Terminal, which served as an art school in the 1920s, is threatened with demolition in the 1970s, and connects the threads of Clara Darden’s and Virginia Clay’s lives. Well researched and captivating.”

Kelly Baroletti, Wantagh Public Library, Wantagh, NY

The Other Woman: A Novel

by Sandie Jones

“Emily thinks she’s found the man of her dreams in Adam. But when she meets Pammie, the woman she hopes will be her future mother-in-law, things take a sinister turn. Fast-paced, gripping, and ultimately satisfying.”

Jenny Moore, Hillsboro Public Library, Hillsboro, OR

Rust & Stardust: A Novel

by T. Greenwood

“Disturbing crime fiction based on real events that inspired Nabokov’s Lolita. In 1948, fifth grade Sally Horner is kidnapped by a man pretending to be a police officer.”

Ninoshka Aviles, Osceola Library, Osceola, FL

Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding

by Rhys Bowen

“The 12th book in the Royal Spyness mystery series finds our heroine, Georgie, juggling all manner of details as she prepares for her upcoming marriage to Darcy. A fun, breezy mystery.”

Cori Dodds, Derby Public Library, Derby, KS

Meet Me at the Museum: A Novel

by Ann Youngson

“A touching epistolary novel about an English farmer’s wife and a museum curator who may be in for an unexpected second act.”

Marilyn Sieb, L.D. Fargo Public Library, Lake Mills, WI

A River of Stars: A Novel

by Vanessa Hua

“A Chinese woman makes her way to America with her unborn daughter determined to make a life for them both. For readers who enjoy modern immigration stories like Behold the Dreamers and Little Fires Everywhere.”

Abby Johnson, New Albany-Floyd County Public Library, New Albany, IN

July 2018 Library Reads

Spinning Silver
by Naomi Novik

“A wonderful reimagining of the Rumpelstiltskin story. A tale of love, family, magic, and destiny, told from the perspective of three strong female characters.”

Melanie Liechty, Logan Library, Logan, UT

Clock Dance: A Novel
by Anne Tyler

“Willa Drake gets a second act when she steps in to care for a nine-year-old in a complicated situation. Character driven fiction and a sweeping storyline.”

Mary Anne Quinn, Warwick Public Library, Warwick, RI

Dear Mrs. Bird: A Novel
by AJ Pearce

“In 1940s London, Emmy takes a job as a typist that evolves into answering rejected letters sent to an advice columnist.”

Judy Hartman, Mechanicsville Public Library, Mechanicsville, IA

Baby Teeth: A Novel
by Zoje Stage

“A fragile woman struggles against her mute daughter’s schemes for her father’s undivided attention. Dark, creepy, and downright scary.”

Kathryn Neal, Skiatook Library, Skiatook, OK

Give Me Your Hand
by Megan Abbott

“Kit competes for her dream job with a rival who was once her closest friend. Gripping psychological suspense.”

Kristy Gates, Craighead County Jonesboro Public Library, Jonesboro, AR

Believe Me: A Novel
by JP Delaney

“An unemployed actress works for a divorce lawyer entrapping unsuspecting husbands until she finds herself ensnared in a murder investigation. This roller-coaster ride of a book will keep you guessing with an unreliable narrator and and a twisty plot.”

Linda Quinn, Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, CT

Caught In Time: A Novel
by Julie McElwain

“The third book in the Kendra Donovan series finds our protagonist investigating the murder of a mill owner against the the backdrop of the Industrial Revolution.”

Melissa Barber, Lubbock Public Library, Lubbock, TX

Somebody’s Daughter
by David Bell

“Michael Frazier is searching for the missing daughter he never knew he had. A multi-layered plot with so many compelling, complex characters, this book grabbed me from the first sentences.”

Evelyn Cunningham, Norwalk Public Library, Norwalk, CT

The Romanov Empress: A Novel of Tsarina Maria Feodorovna by C. W. Gortner

“A look at Maria, Empress of Russia, and her trials before and after becoming the Russian Empress. Well written historical fiction.”

Janette McMahon, Fremont County Library System, WY

Fruit of the Drunken Tree: A Novel
by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

“Set against the violence of 1990s Columbia, a young girl and a maid form an unlikely and dangerous relationship. Equal parts heartwrenching and beautiful.”

Alejandra Rodriguez, Osceola County Library, FL

June 2018 Library Reads Picks

Bring Me Back: A Novel
by B.A. Paris

“Intensifying psychological suspense. Twelve years after Finn’s girlfriend Layla disappeared, a discovery raises new questions.”

Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

There There
by Tommy Orange

“A large cast of interwoven characters depicts the experience of Native Americans living in urban settings. Perfect for readers of character-driven fiction with a strong sense of place.”

Abby Johnson, New Albany-Floyd County Public Library, New Albany, IN

Us Against You: A Novel
by Fredrik Backman

“The citizens of Beartown are about to lose their beloved hockey team and their rivals could not be happier. The narrator has you wondering who is going to die and why events occur as they do.”

Gail Christensen, Kitsap Regional Library, Bremerton, WA

The Word is Murder: A Novel
by Anthony Horowitz

“A playful commentary on the mystery genre itself and the first in a promising new series. The author, Horowitz, plays the part of the narrator, and gets caught up in solving a murder with Daniel Hawthorne, an out-of-work detective.”

Amy Whitfield, Wake County Public Libraries, Cary, NC

Jar of Hearts
by Jennifer Hillier

“A suspenseful thriller told from multiple perspectives. A Seattle detective must unravel a web of secrets dating back to his high school days.”

Gail Roberts, Fairfax County Public Library, Fairfax, VA

Dreams of Falling
by Karen White

“Set in the Lowcountry of South Carolina, this story does what Southern fiction does best: family, lies, and secrets. For fans of Patti Callahan Henry and Mary Alice Monroe.”

Leanne Milliman, Charlevoix Public Library, Charlevoix, MI

The Kiss Quotient
by Helen Hoang

“A wonderfully sweet and erotic romance featuring an autistic heroine who hires a hot male escort to teach her how to enjoy sex, but learns so much more.”

Elizabeth Gabriel, Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, WI

All We Ever Wanted: A Novel
by Emily Giffin

“Great storyline that is relevant to issues both facing young people today and the people raising them. The story keeps you guessing.”

Sarah Trohoske, Erie County Public Library, Erie, PA

Little Big Love
by Katy Regan

“A portrait of a family and a boy’s search for the father who left them, told from multiple perspectives with authentic, likeable characters.”

Kimberly McGee, Lake Travis County Library, Austin, TX

How Hard Can It Be?: A Novel
by Allison Pearson

“Kate is holding it all together, unemployed husband, kids, and parents. So, she reinvents herself as someone younger to secure a job with the hedge fund.”

Toni Nako, The Public Library of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH

May 2018 Library Reads Picks

Furyborn
by Claire Legrand

“Fierce, independent women full of rage, determination, and fire. The first novel in the Empirium trilogy holds appeal for both young adult and adult readers. For fans of Game of Thrones, Once Upon a Time, and The Hunger Games.”

Kristin Friberg, Princeton Library, Princeton, NJ

The Other Lady Vanishes
by Amanda Quick

“Historical romantic suspense. Who would suspect that the quiet California seaside tea shop waitress is actually an escaped mental patient? The second book in Quick’s Burning Cove series has the same 1930s vibe and glamorous, gossipy Hollywood ambiance as The Girl Who Knew Too Much.”

Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

The Death of Mrs. Westaway
by Ruth Ware

“Ware’s best book by far. I finally stopped trying to puzzle it out and just sat back to enjoy the ride.”

Susanne Guide, Union County Public Library, Liberty, IN

The Perfect Mother: A Novel
by Aimee Molloy

“A frank look at mommy culture wrapped in an original twist on the suburban, psychological thriller.”

Jennifer Winberry, Hunterdon County Library, Flemington, NJ

Love and Ruin: A Novel
by Paula McLain

“Biographical and historical fiction. Another fascinating Hemingway wife from McLain who always writes interesting women and great period detail.”

Elizabeth Angelastro, Manilus Library, Manilus, NY

Tin Man: A Novel
by Sarah Winman

“A beautifully written story of love, loss, grief, friendship, and acceptance. The story winds in and out of time in a figure eight like waves reaching shore and receding again.”

Donna Burger, Bryant Library, Roslyn, NY

Our Kind of Cruelty: A Novel
by Araminta Hall

“Disturbing psychological suspense with an unreliable narrator. This is a love story. Or is it? It’s more a story of obsession.”

Jennifer Ohzourk, St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis, MO

Paper Ghosts: A Novel of Suspense
by Julia Heaberlin

“Grace has spent years secretly investigating the disappearance of her older sister. Grace’s prime suspect is Carl Feldman, a photographer, who has been acquitted of the crime and now suffers from dementia. Grace decides that a road trip may jog Carl’s memory.”

Galen Cunniff, Scituate Town Library, Scituate, MA

The Favorite Sister
by Jessica Knoll

“Perfect for the reality TV addicted, this book is gossip laden, full of edge, and contains plenty of surprises.”

Sharon Layburn, Huntington Public Library, Huntington Station, NY

The Ensemble: A Novel
by Aja Gabel

“Set against the backdrop of the highly-competitive and merciless world of classical music, this brilliantly written debut is an exquisite portrait of a group friendship spanning decades. Gabel weaves a lyrical tale of four young musician’s journeys and their complex, yet resilient, relationships with each other. For fans of The Interestings, A Little Life, and A Secret History.”

Mayleen Kelley, JV Fletcher Library, Westford MA

JANUARY 2018 LIBRARY READS PICKS

The Immortalists
by Chloe Benjamin

“A thought-provoking, sweeping family saga set in New York City’s Lower East Side, 1969. Four siblings sneak out to visit a psychic who reveals to each, separately, the exact date of his or her death. The book goes on to recount five decades of experience shaped by the siblings attempts to control fate.”

- Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library, Delphi, IN

The Wife Between Us: A Novel
by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen

“A thriller told from the perspective of three narrators: a woman, her ex-husband, and his fiance. The storyline is intricate and nonlinear and the characters are likable, but unreliable. This one will keep you guessing.”

- Kelly Moore, Carrollton Public Library, Carrollton, TX

The Woman in the Window: A Novel
by A.J. Finn

“A menacing psychological thriller that starts out like Rear Window and then veers off into unexpected places. An agoraphobic recluse languishes in her New York City home, drinking wine and spying on her neighbors. One day she witnesses a crime that threatens to expose her secrets.”

- Joseph Jones, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Cuyahoga, OH

Promise Not To Tell
by Jayne Ann Krentz

“Virginia owns a successful art gallery in Seattle now, but she has had to overcome many demons from her childhood in a cult. When one of her artists commits suicide, leaving her a mysterious message, she suspects the cult leader may have resurfaced.”

- Kelly Rohde, Mead Public Library, Sheboygan, WI​

The Wedding Date
by Jasmine Guillory

“Drew is in San Francisco for his ex-girlfriend’s wedding. When he finds himself stuck in an elevator with Alexa, they hatch a plan to go to the wedding together, pretending to be a couple. Told in alternating points of view, this is a delightful multicultural romance.”

- Elizabeth Gabriel, Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, WI

Carnegie’s Maid: A Novel
by Marie Benedict

“Engaging, richly-detailed, biographical, and historical fiction. In 1860s Pittsburgh, Clara, an Irish immigrant takes a job working as a maid for Andrew Carnegie, with whom she falls in love, and then goes missing.”

- Carol Ann Tack, Merrick Library, Merrick, NY

Beneath the Sugar Sky
by Seanan McGuire

“McGuire continues her astounding Wayward Children series with the third volume. A fantastical journey to find and resurrect a mother in a land of sweets. A great fantasy for those who want to give the genre a try.”

- Andrienne Cruz, Azusa City Library, Azusa, CA

Still Me: A Novel
by Jojo Moyes

“The irrepressible Louisa Clark is back and she has a new job as an assistant to the super wealthy Gopniks in New York City. She’s thrilled, a little overwhelmed, and unsure how distance will affect her relationship with her boyfriend, Sam. A spirited look at New York high society.”

- Lynn Lobash, New York Public Library, New York, NY

The Girl in the Tower: A Novel
by Katherine Arden

“Vasilisa’s gift for seeing what others do not won her the attention of Morozko and together they saved her people from destruction. Compelling political intrigue set in medieval Russia with a twist of folklore and some lush and inventive world building.”

- Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Eternal Life: A Novel
by Dara Horn

“Ever since she made a deal to save her son’s life in Roman-occupied Jerusalem, Rachel has been doomed to live eternally. When one of her grandchildren tries to study the secret of her longevity and asks for a DNA sample, her world spins out of control.”

- Kimberly McGee, Lake Travis Library, Austin, TX

Library Reads Favorites of 2017

Little Fires Everywhere
by Celeste Ng

“Little Fires Everywhere delves into family relationships and what parenthood, either biological or by adoption, means. We follow the members of two families living in the idyllic, perfectly-planned suburb of Shaker Heights, Ohio: Mia and Pearl, a mother and daughter living a less traditional lifestyle, moving from town to town every few months, and the Richardsons, the perfect nuclear family in the perfect suburb…until Izzy Richardson burns her family home down. Ng’s superpower is her ability to pull you into her books from the very first sentence!”

- Emma DeLooze-Klein, Kirkwood Public Library, Kirkwood, MO

The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women
by Kate Moore

“This is the story of hundreds of young, vibrant women who were sentenced to death by their employers. The so-called “Radium Girls” painted luminescent faces on clock and watch dials using a paint mixture that contained radium. Instructed to “lip-point” their brushes as they painted, they absorbed high doses of radium into their bodies. When the effects of the radium led to horrific disfigurement and pain, the company refused to take responsibility. This heartrending book was one I could not put down.”

- Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: A Novel
by Gail Honeyman

“I loved this book about the quirky Eleanor, who struggles to relate to other people and lives a very solitary life. When she and the new work IT guy happen to be walking down the street together, they witness an elderly man collapse on the sidewalk and suddenly Eleanor’s orderly routines are disrupted. This is a lovely novel about loneliness and how a little bit of kindness can change a person forever. Highly recommended for fans of A Man Called Ove and The Rosie Project – this would make a great book club read.”

- Halle Eisenman, Beaufort County Library, Blufton, SC

News of the World: A Novel
by Paulette Jiles

“Readers fortunate enough to meet Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, an old ex-soldier who makes a living reading the news to townspeople in 1870s Texas, and Joanna, the Indian captive he is charged with returning to her relatives, will not soon forget them. Everything, from the vividly realized Texas frontier setting to the characters is beautifully crafted, right up to the moving conclusion. Both the Captain and Joanna have very distinctive voices. Wonderful storytelling.”

- Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Glass Houses: A Novel
by Louise Penny

“A new threat arises in Three Pines as a mysterious masked figure stands watch on the village green. ‘It’ refuses to communicate in any way, which is just the start of another thrilling adventure in this long-running series. Gamache is still trying to restore the Sûreté du Québec back to what it was before it was corrupted under the previous regime. Choices are made that will forever change our hero in ways we can only begin to imagine. The next book can’t get here fast enough.”

- Joseph Jones, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Brooklyn, OH

Small Great Things: A Novel
by Jodi Picoult

“A black neonatal nurse is charged with causing the death of a white supremacist’s newborn baby. The story is told from the points of view of the nurse, her attorney, and the baby’s heartbroken father. As always, Picoult’s attention to legal, organizational, and medical details help the tale ring true. What sets this book apart, though, are the uncomfortable points it makes about racism. The novel is both absorbing and thought-provoking, and will surely spark conversations among friends, families and book clubs.”

- Laurie Van Court, Douglas County Libraries, Castle Rock, CO

Magpie Murders
by Anthony Horowitz

“Susan Ryeland is a London book editor who has just received the latest manuscript from one of her most irascible authors, Alan Conway. But the manuscript’s ending appears to be missing and she learns that Conway has committed suicide. As Ryeland learns more about his death, she starts to question whether a murder has occurred and begins to investigate. Magpie Murders is a delightful, clever mystery-within-a-mystery. Horowitz shows real mastery of his craft. This is a terrific, modern take on the traditional mystery with ingenious puzzles to solve.”

- Andrea Larson, Cook Memorial Library, Libertyville, IL

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
by David Grann

“In the 1920s, a string of unsolved murders rocked the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. Made rich by oil rights, the Osage were already victimized by unscrupulous businessmen and societal prejudice, but these murders were so egregious, the newly formed FBI was brought in to investigate. Immensely readable, this book brings a shameful part of U.S. history alive and will keep readers thinking long after they have finished the book.”

- Jenna Persick, Chester County Library, Exton, PA

The Dry: A Novel
by Jane Harper

“’Luke lied. You lied. Be at the funeral.’ These eight words will change everything for Agent Aaron Falk, summoned by the father or his former best friend. It appears Luke went on a rampage, murdering his wife, son, and then himself. At Luke’s father’s request, Aaron agrees to look into the murders/suicide and learns that the small town has long held grudges and secrets that may be best kept hidden in this atmospheric, chilling complex tale of anger and revenge.”

- Jennifer Winberry, Hunterdon County Library, Flemington, NJ

Beartown: A Novel
by Fredrik Backman

“Backman’s most complex novel to date takes place in the small, hockey-crazed village of Beartown. He deftly weaves together the stories of the players, the coaches, the parents, and the fans as Beartown’s hockey team chases its dream of winning a championship. Weighty themes are explored. How high a price is too high for success? How deadly is silence? Who can you trust with your secrets? How far will you compromise your beliefs in the name of friendship? There are no easy answers. A great book club choice.”

- Janet Lockhart, Wake County Public Library, Cary, NC